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Howard Falcon-Lang
Howard Falcon-Lang
Professor of Palaeontology, Royal Holloway, University of London
Verified email at es.rhul.ac.uk - Homepage
Title
Cited by
Cited by
Year
Rainforest collapse triggered Carboniferous tetrapod diversification in Euramerica
S Sahney, MJ Benton, HJ Falcon-Lang
Geology 38 (12), 1079-1082, 2010
2202010
Cyclic changes in Pennsylvanian paleoclimate and effects on floristic dynamics in tropical Pangaea
WA DiMichele, CB Cecil, IP Montañez, HJ Falcon-Lang
International Journal of Coal Geology 83 (2-3), 329-344, 2010
1602010
Pennsylvanian tropical rain forests responded to glacial-interglacial rhythms
HJ Falcon-Lang
Geology 32 (8), 689-692, 2004
1352004
Incised channel fills containing conifers indicate that seasonally dry vegetation dominated Pennsylvanian tropical lowlands
HJ Falcon-Lang, WJ Nelson, S Elrick, CV Looy, PR Ames, WA DiMichele
Geology 37 (10), 923-926, 2009
1302009
The Pennsylvanian tropical biome reconstructed from the Joggins Formation of nova Scotia, Canada
HJ Falcon-Lang, MJ Benton, SJ Braddy, SJ Davies
Journal of the Geological Society 163 (3), 561-576, 2006
1202006
Pennsylvanian ‘fossil forests' in growth position (T0 assemblages): origin, taphonomic bias and palaeoecological insights
WA DiMichele, HJ Falcon-Lang
Journal of the Geological Society 168 (2), 585-605, 2011
1132011
What happened to the coal forests during Pennsylvanian glacial phases?
HJ Falcon-Lang, WA DiMichele
Palaios 25 (9), 611-617, 2010
1132010
Upland ecology of some Late Carboniferous cordaitalean trees from Nova Scotia and England
HJ Falcon-Lang, AC Scott
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 156 (3-4), 225-242, 2000
1132000
Fire ecology of the Carboniferous tropical zone
HJ Falcon-Lang
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 164 (1-4), 339-355, 2000
1112000
Pennsylvanian uplands were forested by giant cordaitalean trees
HJ Falcon-Lang, AR Bashforth
Geology 32 (5), 417-420, 2004
1062004
Late Carboniferous tropical dryland vegetation in an alluvial-plain setting, Joggins, Nova Scotia, Canada
HJ Falcon-Lang
Palaios 18 (3), 197-211, 2003
1052003
Biodiversity and terrestrial ecology of a mid-Cretaceous, high-latitude floodplain, Alexander Island, Antarctica
HJ Falcon-Lang, DJ Cantrill, GJ Nichols
Journal of the Geological Society 158 (4), 709-724, 2001
1002001
Cretaceous (Late Albian) coniferales of Alexander Island, Antarctica. 1: wood taxonomy: a quantitative approach
HJ Falcon-Lang, DJ Cantrill
Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 111 (1-2), 1-17, 2000
952000
Morphology, anatomy, and upland ecology of large cordaitalean trees from the Middle Pennsylvanian of Newfoundland
HJ Falcon-Lang, AR Bashforth
Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 135 (3-4), 223-243, 2005
932005
Palaeozoic co-evolution of rivers and vegetation: a synthesis of current knowledge
MR Gibling, NS Davies, HJ Falcon-Lang, AR Bashforth, WA DiMichele, ...
Proceedings of the Geologists' Association 125 (5-6), 524-533, 2014
922014
The relationship between leaf longevity and growth ring markedness in modern conifer woods and its implications for palaeoclimatic studies
HJ Falcon-Lang
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 160 (3-4), 317-328, 2000
892000
Ecological gradients within a Pennsylvanian mire forest
WA DiMichele, HJ Falcon-Lang, WJ Nelson, SD Elrick, PR Ames
Geology 35 (5), 415-418, 2007
842007
Paleoecology of early Pennsylvanian vegetation on a seasonally dry tropical landscape (Tynemouth Creek Formation, New Brunswick, Canada)
AR Bashforth, CJ Cleal, MR Gibling, HJ Falcon-Lang, RF Miller
Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 200, 229-263, 2014
812014
Small cordaitalean trees in a marine-influenced coastal habitat in the Pennsylvanian Joggins Formation, Nova Scotia
HJ Falcon-Lang
Journal of the Geological Society 162 (3), 485-500, 2005
792005
Biogeographic analysis of Jurassic–Early Cretaceous wood assemblages from Gondwana
M Philippe, M Bamford, S McLoughlin, LSR Alves, HJ Falcon-Lang, ...
Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology 129 (3), 141-173, 2004
782004
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